Thai Stink Beans with Shrimp [Recipe]

[Recipe Video] – Thai Stink Beans with Shrimp (Goong Pad Sataw)

 

 

Stink beans, which in Thai are called sataw, are also commonly called (petai, bitter, bean, stinky bean, or smelly beans), are commonly found in southern island parts of southeast Asia, especially in southern Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. The scientific name is parkia speciosa, the beans grow in large twisted pods. The pods are tough and you have to first cut the skin to take out the beans. In Thailand, stink beans are eaten raw and also cooked in a number of different dishes. Goong pad sataw, or Thai style stink beans fried with shrimp and southern Thai curry paste, is one of my favorite dishes in the world – I could honestly probably eat it everyday of my life.

I’ve been a lover of stink beans for many years now, and my mother in-law has been cooking stink beans for years, so I’m happy to finally be sharing this recipe with you – I hope you can find some stink beans to be able to give this recipe a try (but if you can’t find any, you can substitute something like green beans or Chinese long beans).

Here are the ingredients you’ll need for this stink beans recipe:

400 grams shrimp (I’m using shrimp because I love them, but you can use any type of meat you like)
2 – 3 heaping tbsp southern Thai curry paste, redipe here: http://www.eatingthaifood.com/2014/11/how-to-make-southern-thai-curry-paste/
1 cup of shelled stink beans (I used 6 pods, and you can use more or less)
1/2 tsp shrimp paste
1/2 tbsp oyster sauce
1/2 tbsp sugar (This is the Thai way, but I like to use less or none)
6 – 8 kaffir lime leaves
2 tbsp oil for frying

Goong Pad Sataw is actually quite easy to make, and doesn’t take a lot of time, as long as you have the southern Thai curry paste ready. The paste can take 1 – 2 hours to make, especially if you pound it by hand, but once you have a batch ready, you can make a number of different southern Thai food dishes with it, and it should keep in the fridge for a few weeks – though it will probably taste the best when it’s fresh … see more great Thai cooking videos by Mark Wiens at: EatingThaiFood.com

Video Source: Mark Wiens

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